Isla de La Palma Isla de La Palma Guide
An online Travel Guide to La Palma, Canary Islands
Holiday homes on La Palma, Canary Islands

 

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The Canary PineDeze pagina in Nederlands
La Palma rises 2450 meters out of the Atlantic ocean and has a wide variety of trees.
The upper regions are dominated by the Canarian Pine tree, Pinus Canariensis - the Canary or Canarian Pine tree. This variety is only to be found on the Canary Islands. Normally they grow to about 30metres ans a diameter of about 1metre but they can grow to be hundreds of years old and 50metres tall. The bark is thick and formed by layers of hard and almost unburnable layers which protect the tree from the occassional forest fire.
The core of the trunk is saturated with resin which makes it a very durable hardwood known as Tea wood (te-a). Large areas of La Palma was covered on pines which were chopped down for wood and to make charcoal. Cutting down Canarian Pine trees is now forbidden op La Palma. The wood was traditionally used for the floor, roof, windows and balconies of Canarian houses. Wooden chests were also made of the wood, which has now become almost unobtainable and therefore very expensive.
Place: Garafia
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services This mountain, high above the clouds,
is covered with Canary pine-trees and codeso, a broom, flowering in June/July.
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Big pine trees, big pine cones (15cm)
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The Canarian Pine grows new branches from the old trunk.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Layers of bark protect the tree from the occasional forest fire.
This sawn off tree shows the profuse quantity of resin in the trunk (left).
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The bark of the Canarian Pine tree is made up of numerous layers, they are very resistant to fire and allow them to survive the occassional forest fire.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Huge pine needles are typical of the Canarian Pine. The needles are triangular in cross-section which allows dew and mist to be collected and drip onto the forest floor. The 'candles' (new growth) can be clearly seen.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Puntagorda, El Fayal
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services This tree is beautifully shaped
by the wind.
 
Place: Puntagorda, Refugio El Fayal
Date: 2000-08
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Canarian Pine trees on the edge of barranca de Izcagau in Puntagorda.
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services A tree formed, or misformed?, by a strong wind which wips over the edge of the gorge just a few meters from this tree.
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Los Llanos
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Mist in the trees. The needles of the Canarian pine are shaped to help collect this mist which then drips to the ground supplying both man and tree.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services A real survivor. This tree was probably damaged by a rock fall or eaten by goats. The growth of needles all around the branches shows that it is re-growth. Normally the needles are just at the tips of the branches.
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: EL Paso, Virgen del Pinar
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services An extremely old and twisted Pine tree near the Church Virgen del Pinar above El Paso.
 
Place: EL Paso, Virgen del Pinar
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
Place: Cumbrecita
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services A pine tree stuggeling for survival on an erosion slope in the Caldera. The soil around the roots gets eroded away forcing the roots to go deeper into the hard rocks.
 
 
The Canary Pine trees La Palma, Canary Islands
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