Isla de La Palma Isla de La Palma Guide
An online Travel Guide to La Palma, Canary Islands
Holiday homes on La Palma, Canary Islands

 

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La Palma is, after El Hierro, the youngest Canary island. In the last 500 years there have been 7 volcanic eruptions, the last being in 1971.
All of those eruptions were quiet small, no explosions and nothing disastrous. Lava issues from craters or fissures and throws a plume of smoke and ash into the air and lave splutters and then flows down the hillside. In 1949 there were 2 minor earthquakes which were felt around the island but caused little damage, just a few cracks in walls.
If you know where to look there are a few places in gaps in the rocks around Volcano Tenaguia, at the southern point of the island, where you can feel the warmth below the ground.
Place: Los Canarios, San Antonio
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The inside of the San Antonio volcano.
 
Place: Los Canarios, San Antonio
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The inside of the San Antonio volcano.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Place: Los Canarios, San Antonio
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The San Antonio volcanoic crater with the village of Fuencaliente above.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Teneguia Volcano erupted in 1971 and created a new crater, lava flows down to the sea and several square kilometers of new land.
Place: Fuencaliente
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The last eruption on La Palma was
in 1971 from the Teneguia,
and continued for 24 days.
In some clefts you can feel the
warmth and smell the sulphur.
 
Place: Los Canarios, Teneguia
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The Volcan de Teneguia as seen from the San Antonio crater rim.
A solidified lava flow can be clearly seen emerging from the front-near-side of the crater and travelling to the left and down to the sea.
 
Place: Los Canarios, Teneguia
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The heat from the magma deep underground can still be felt in some of the cracks and crevices in the Volcan de Teneguia. There is often the smell of Sulphur but it gets less every year.
 
Place: El Paso
Date: 2001
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Black volcanic landscape dotted with the colours of native plants.
 
Place: Los Canarios, Teneguia
Date: 2000
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services The new (post-1971) road cuts right through the lava flow near the coast in Fuencaliente.
 
Place: Los Canarios, San Antonio
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Below the San Antonio volcano the landscape is black.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Place: El Paso, Cumbre
Date: 2002
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Solitary pines on the volcanic solopes just below the Refugio El Pilar
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services A volcanic bomb. This is formed when hot lava is thrown into the air and cools into a 'water drop' form in the air. With luck the remain whole when reaching solid earth.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Volcanic bombs. One round and one more elongated.
 
The road between Las Manchas and Jedey passes through a lava flow. At several places along the road you can see evidence of the liquid lava flowing and cooling on the surface.
Place: Los Llanos, Las Manchas
Date: 2002-12
Copyright: Gerard van Kempen The author (Brian) standing on one of the lava flows in Las Manchas.
 
Place: Los Llanos, Las Manchas
Date: 2002-12
Copyright: Gerard van Kempen The Las Manchas lava flows clearly showing that the liquid lava flowed as a thick liquid and solidified with ripples.
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services    
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2002-04
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Lava deposits in layers in Garafia.
Grit to gravel sized pieces probably thrown out of a small volcanic crater as molten drops which then solidified in the air and formed layers cemented together with volcanic ash.
 
Place: Garafia
Date: 2002-04
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services Rope lava in Garafia.
The thick magma in a slow moving lava flow cooled on the surface whilst still moving causing a rope-like surface.
 
Place: Los Llanos, Las Manchas
Date: 2002-12
Copyright: Gerard van Kempen These 2 volcanic cones were created when lava from the main crater (above on the Cumbre) forced its way through the rocks to escape and create this cone shape.
 
Place: Tijarafe
Date: 2000-11
Copyright: Brian Smith, BTS Internet Services
 
 
Volcanoes of La Palma, Canary Islands
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